Let the word go forth from this time and place, to friend and foe alike, that the torch has been passed to a new generation of Americans—born in this century, tempered by war, disciplined by a hard and bitter peace, proud of our ancient heritage—and unwilling to witness or permit the slow undoing of those human rights to which this Nation has always been committed, and to which we are committed today at home and around the world.

Let every nation know, whether it wishes us well or ill, that we shall pay any price, bear any burden, meet any hardship, support any friend, oppose any foe, in order to assure the survival and the success of liberty.

This much we pledge—and more.

In perhaps, one of the most inspiring inaugural speeches of the 20th Century, second only to everything that Ronald Reagan ever said, John F. Kennedy challenged the people of the nation to put selfishness aside, and ask themselves what they could do for the country. Today, nearly five decades later, JFK’s last surviving child, inspired by President-elect Obama’s election, is looking to take up politics, and is asking the State of New York to do something for her…fifty-one years of living in the shadow of the whole “ask not what your country can do for you” thing, and little Miss Camelot didn’t get it.

Ms. Kennedy (B.A. from Harvard/Radcliffe, and a J.D. from Columbia Law) was recently interviewed by The Daily News on the subject of her filling the seat left empty by Sen. Clinton in New York, and from reading the interview, one gets the distinct notion that oratorical skills are not genetically transferred from one generation to the next..

Here are her remarks:

I’m really coming into this as somebody who isn’t, you know, part of the system, who obviously, you know, stands for the values of, you know, the Democratic Party

I know how important it is to, you know, to be my own person. And, you know, and that would be obviously true with my relationship with the mayor.

I’m not as shy as everybody makes me out to be.

Andrew is, you know, highly qualified for this job.

He’s doing a, you know, a great job as attorney general, and we’ve spoken throughout this process.

You know, I think, you know, we’re sort of, uh, sharing some of this experience. And um, as I’ve said, he was a friend, a family member, and um so, and uh obviously, he’s, you know, he’s also had an impressive career in public office.

It’s really, you know, it’s not about just the Kennedy name. It’s about my own work and what I’ve done with those values.I’m starving.

That’s 165 words, peppered with 11 “you knows”, and two “ums”.

Let’s see how that plays with Dad’s earlier speech:

Let the word, you know, go forth from this time and, um, place, to friend and foe alike, that the torch has been, you know, passed to a new generation of, um, Americans—born in this century, tempered by, you know, war, disciplined by a hard and bitter peace, proud of our, um, ancient heritage—and unwilling to, you know, witness or permit the slow undoing of, you know, those human rights to which this Nation has always been committed, and to which we, um, are committed today at home and around the world.

Let every, um, nation know, whether it wishes us well or, you know, ill, that we shall pay any price, bear any burden, meet any, you know, hardship, support any friend, oppose any, um, foe, in order to assure the survival and the success of, you know, liberty.

This much we pledge—whatever.

Ok, that wasn’t fair, Caroline hasn’t used “whatever”…yet.